Official (and legendary) apps PuTTY and Audacity hit the Microsoft Store

Source: Daniel Rubino / Windows Central

The new Microsoft Store for Windows 11 (and now Windows 10 as well) has brought newly relaxed policies that allow old “classic” apps to be listed without adopting new Microsoft technology like installers. The effort is to entice developers to put their apps on the store in hopes that they will slowly start using more modern tools to provide a better customer experience.

As of today, two very old and still very popular apps are now available in the Store: Audacity and PuTTY (via @kid_jenius).

The new apps join other big titles first announced with Windows 11, including Zoom, Epic Games, Firefox, Opera, Discord, Disney+, TikTok, Adobe Creative Cloud Express, Canva and WinZip, in addition to already existing apps like iTunes, iCloud, Netflix and Amazon Prime.

Audacity is a well-known, free, easy-to-use audio editor and multitrack recording tool. Originally released in 2000, the open-source app has since been downloaded over 200 million times. The app is pretty relevant in 2022 and will likely be a go-to for those who want to get started with easy-to-use audio editing options (Fun fact: in the early 2010s our podcast was edited by me in Audacity) .

The next application is also a legend: PuTTY. PuTTY is another free and open-source project and acts as a terminal emulator, serial console, and network file transfer application. According to Wikipedia, “PuTTY” has no official meaning despite its unique capitalization. Like Audacity, it was developed in the late 1990s and was available for download in 2000 – apparently a great year for free software.

Either way, both are available now, and we can’t wait to see what other age-old goodies appear.

To learn more about the story of Microsoft’s new Store for Windows 11, including design goals and features, check out my interview with Giorgio Sardo, General Manager of the New Microsoft Store.

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Steven L. Nielsen