WATCH Blind learners in South Africa learn to code with a braille game – SAPeople

WATCH Blind learners play Rangers, paving the way for the braille version of the coding game. Photos provided

“This week at the Bona Ubuntu program, we saw the first blind and visually impaired learners interact with our coding game RANGERS – paving the way for a braille version of our games!” says Professor Jean Greyling of Nelson Mandela University (NMU) in South Africa. (Watch below.)

Professor Greyling of Nelson Mandela University (NMU), in partnership with the Leva Foundation, has been leading the Tangible Africa project since 2017. Using their coding apps, personalized tokens and image recognition, they have introduced more than 50,000 learners to computer-free coding. The coding method they used is called block coding (as used in Scratch).

Bulk coding for the blind

Of their partnership with the Bona Ubuntu program, Professor Greyling says, “This has got to be one of the most special moments in the five years of our project.” Special thanks, he says, go to the Leva Foundation’s director of operations, Jackson Tshabalala, for organizing it.

In an early prototype, the on-screen challenge is simulated by a physical grid, while “Braille labels” are added to the tokens.

DON’T MISS: Tangible Africa for the Blind: Braille Version of the Rangers Coding Game

Monday – Nelson Mandela Day (July 18) – Tangible Africa will host nearly 50 Mandela Day tournaments in the nine provinces as well as in some African countries. 5,000 learners will participate!

Monday - Nelson Mandela Day (July 18) - Tangible Africa will host nearly 50 Mandela Day tournaments across all nine provinces as well as select African countries.  5,000 learners will participate!
Monday – Nelson Mandela Day (July 18) – Tangible Africa will host nearly 50 Mandela Day tournaments across all nine provinces as well as select African countries. 5,000 learners will participate! Photos provided

WATCH the Rangers Coding Game

If you would like to support or be part of the project contact Professor Greyling, Nelson Mandela University – 0835544183


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Steven L. Nielsen